Divorce

Below are readers' questions about 'Divorce', which we have chosen to answer. More detailed information on 'Divorce' can be found on our main website, Family Law in Israel.

You may claim that the Family Court lacks jurisdiction to rule over this matter and ask to strike out your ex-wife's file, there. If your wife had had objections to the matter being heard at the Rabbinical Court, she should have claimed so at the first possible opportunity presented to her. The supreme Court In Israel has ruled before on a similar matter that if a party participates in a legal procedure at the Rabbinical Court and does not express his/her objection about the Rabbinical Court's jurisdiction, then the "first opportunity" to claim against jurisdiction (here- of the Rabbinical Court) has been lost and his/her silence may be interpreted as acquiescence.

Yes. You should file a plea at the Rabbinical Court or at The Family Court to dismiss the relevant section in your divorce agreement due to a breach of the agreement; or file to have the agreement interpreted due to your son's insufferable behavior toward you. If in your divorce agreement your son's behavior is mentioned as a condition and/or if your ex- wifes declared in your agreement that she would not alienate your son against you, then you may ask to cancel your financial obligation toward your son, in view of the present situation.

Yes. You should file a plea at the Rabbinical Court or at The Family Court to dismiss the relevant section in your divorce agreement due to a breach of the agreement; or file to have the agreement interpreted due to your son's insufferable behavior toward you. If in your divorce agreement your son's behavior is mentioned as a condition and/or if your ex- wifes declared in your agreement that she would not alienate your son against you, then you may ask to cancel your financial obligation toward your son, in view of the present situation.

NO! if you have not objected to the Family court's authority at the first opportunity you had, then you may not do so afterwards, when hearing have taken place and/or decisions have been given by the Family Court and just because these decisions do not please you.

NO! if you have not objected to the Family court's authority at the first opportunity you had, then you may not do so afterwards, when hearing have taken place and/or decisions have been given by the Family Court and just because these decisions do not please you.